Learning Bets
Chapter: The Who

Meet Your Provocateurs

In Spring of 2015, hoping to accelerate progress for students and teachers across our network, Teach For All interviewed and brought together expert-practitioners with programmatic leaders from partner organizations in the Teach For All network to explore divergent views on how we can best grow great classroom leaders.  Throughout this provocation paper, you find insights from these teacher-trainers:

MICHAEL ARONSON Teach For America

VERONICA CABEZAS Enseña Chile

SUSANA CLARO Stanford University

LANEISHA COBB SANDERS Teach For America

TIM DALY THE NEW TEACHER PROJECT

“The things that we generally make our decisions on are almost completely unrelated across these settings to whether teachers are showing improvement on the “objective” measures. . . . There’s no way to overstate this: the research base on teacher improvement is just disturbingly bad and not  instructive.”

 

ADRIENNE DIXSON ASSC PROFESSOR, U of CHICAGO at URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

How we develop people of color and what they bring to the table is sort of missing. The way we are talking about teacher education – I wouldn’t be successful.”

 

ESTHER DRAKE Teach For America

SAM FREEDMAN TeachFirst (UK)

MIKE GOLDSTEIN MATCH EDUCATION & BRIDGE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMIES

“You try to extract permission from the teacher or future teacher to be very prescriptive. My general view is that it is easier for more people to climb the ladder of the specific and get some positive momentum with basic, foundation skills so they see real progress. That foundation of progress can  then catalyze some of the large “self” work because they’ve experienced, in a real way, some self-driven progress.”

 

 

JENNIFER GREEN THE URBAN TEACHER CENTER

“Your practice is always public.  That’s notion one.  Our practice is public in support of kids.”

 

JENEE HENRY Teach For America

DIANA HUANG Teach For China

JULIE JACKSON Uncommon Schools

“How many people are teaching our kids and have not even walked around those neighborhoods? Have not even had the discussion about what it takes to be successful in that community?  Have not even attended anything in that  community?”

 

BEN JENSEN LEARNING FIRST (Australia)

“[Teacher learning is driven by] a cycle of assessing their students, building practice to best teach those students, and then evaluating the impact of that process.”

 

RAIMUNDO LARRAIN Impulso Docente

DOUG LEMOV UNCOMMON SCHOOLS & TEACH LIKE A CHAMPION

We are going to choose the most important things, we’re going to practice them like crazy, you’re going to learn the skill, and then we’re going to start practicing in a way that causes you to have to think about the problem solving part of it which is when do I use it and how do I use it once I’ve learned the skill. Of course, you can’t practice that metacognitive part of how does this get adapted to the situation and when and why would I use this until you know how to do it.

 

AMBIKA KAPUR Carnegie Foundation

BRENT MADDIN RELAY GRAD SCHOOL OF ED

“The “how” that we are betting on is that we think that people are learning best by doing“

 

MORVA MACDONALD UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, UACT

“Preparing people to actually teach content is the window into teaching. . . .I would say that providing deep experience for people in which they are approximating practice is essential if what you want to do is facilitate a couple things, one of which is their understanding of the complexity of the work. . .”

 

ANDREW MANDEL Teach for America

NOOR MASOOD Teach For Pakistan

 

ELLEN MOIR NEW TEACHER CENTER

“A teachers’ role must evolve to include being a continuous learner – someone who is curious, persistent and reflective. These are the three dispositions of highly effective teachers. When teachers evolve into continuous learners and adopt these dispositions, they are willing to ask questions about instruction and take risks to reach every student; they persevere in solving complex issues and believe all students can learn; and they are open to feedback and seek opportunities to grow professionally.”

 

FRANCO MOSSO Enseña Peru

 

AMBLER OCHSTEIN Schusterman Foundation

ANNIE O’DONNELL Teach For America

TED QUINN Teach For America

TOMAS RECART Enseña Chile

 

PEPE JOSE REVILLA Enseña Peru

BEN RILEY Deans for Impact

“Too often, people are inclined to go with their gut when it comes to education. The more we can elevate robust and empirical education, the better.”

TODD ROSE HARVARD & THE CENTER FOR INDIVIDUAL OPPORTUNITY

“[In all sciences] we went through a phase where we thought we could understand individuals by using an average, a type, a rank order.  Those were bad assumptions, and the exact same ones we make in our entire education system.  No we’re talking about individual teacher development and growth and helping them seek individual kids, and I can’t help but think that we can’t get to where we want to go without changing our whole way of thinking.  We won’t get there.   

 

SARA SANDS Carnegie Foundation

ROMANA SHAIHKTeach For India

 

TOMAS VERGERA Enseña Chile

MI ZHENHUA Teach For China


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Nate Kerr
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Hi – leaving this in response to the learning bets paper: This was an incredibly useful and in depth overview of why we should make bets around learning theory and what specific teacher training decisions these bets likely entail. One thing that I would add that I didn’t see explicitly discussed here is the question around “how do we effectively achieve gradual release for teaching candidates?” I don’t think many people would argue with the bet that some form of gradual release of ownership/responsibility is needed within teacher training, but a lot of unexplored assumptions seem to be being made… Read more »